Leading geriatric medicine specialist encourages New Zealand Pharmacists to recognise symptoms of early Alzheimer’s disease in patients

Leading geriatric medicine specialist encourages New Zealand Pharmacists to recognise symptoms of early Alzheimer’s disease in patients

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Michael Woodward
Globally recognised specialist in geriatric medicine and Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine, Associate Professor Michael Woodward

New Zealand pharmacists are being urged to be aware of an early stage of Alzheimer’s disease as recent research helps to provide hope for diagnosed patients

Alzheimer’s disease can be managed

Around two-thirds of people with dementia have Alzheimer’s disease.1 Globally recognised specialist in geriatric medicine and Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine, Associate Professor Michael Woodward says Alzheimer’s disease can be managed with a combination of lifestyle changes and medications: “Acting early by recognising symptoms in the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease and speaking to a pharmacist can help New Zealanders ensure the condition is correctly identified and managed appropriately to prolong its potential progression into dementia.”

New study shows nutritional intervention is clinically proven to help sustain memory and cognition

“Findings of the first independently run, peer reviewed EU-funded clinical trial to investigate the effects of nutritional drink Souvenaid® in patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s Disease show for the first time that a nutritional intervention has been clinically proven to help sustain memory and cognition in the long-term when taken daily over 3 years.2

The first independently run, peer reviewed EU-funded clinical trial to investigate the effects of nutritional drink Souvenaid® in patients with early stage Alzheimer’s Disease - known also as Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) - has been published in the peer-reviewed publication Alzheimer's & Dementia®: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, with the results showing for the first time that a nutritional intervention has been clinically proven to help sustain memory and cognition in the long-term when taken daily over 3 years.1

The findings conclude that taken daily, Souvenaid® - a specific combination of fatty acids, vitamins and other nutrients available in New Zealand - is clinically proven to slow the progression of memory and cognitive decline by 60 per cent in early Alzheimer’s disease including mild cognitive impairment.1 The clinical data also indicates that Souvenaid reduced brain shrinkage by 33 per cent and reduced the loss of everyday task performance by 45 per cent.1

Souvenaid® can help with the earliest stage of Alzheimer’s Disease in the long-term

Excitingly, the findings of the LipiDiDiet (LDD) Study at 36-months support and extend those concluded at the 24-month marks, confirming that Souvenaid® can help to sustain memory and cognitive performance, the ability to think and perform everyday tasks, as well as reduce brain shrinkage in people with the earliest stage of AD in the long-term. The study confirms the benefit of starting early, and shows that benefits can be sustained over 3 years. 1

“These results show that for those in the early stage of Alzheimer's disease, 3 years of taking Souvenaid daily slows the progression of memory and cognitive decline, and also reduces structural damage in the brain. These results are incredibly important because currently there are no approved treatment options for mild cognitive impairment in New Zealand,” explains Associate Professor Woodward.

Souvenaid® is classed as a food for special medical purposes and is designed to be taken every day. It’s available in NZ from select pharmacies and can be found online at www.souvenaid.co.nz. It’s recommended pharmacists speak with their patients before use to determine whether Souvenaid can benefit them.

Souvenaid Fact Sheet 2020
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References
  1. Alzheimer’s New Zealand website, accessed 15 September 2021: https://alzheimers.org.nz/about-dementia/what-is-dementia/
  2. Soininen H, Solomon A, Visser PJ, et al.36-month LipiDiDietmultinutrient clinical trial in prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s Dement. 2020;1–12. https://doi.org/10.1002/alz.12172